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erikkwakkel:

Great little manuscript from Charlotte Bronte
A few years ago this super charming manuscript written by one of the Bronte sisters was auctioned off. Before the talented sisters became known for their now classical novels, they made little handwritten magazines with stories for their own pleasure. Miraculously, this one from 1830 survived. It contains three short stories by Charlotte Bronte (d. 1855), who is best known as the author of Jane Eyre. The manuscript measures only 61x35 mm (half a credit card), but its nineteen pages contain a combined 4000 words. Now that’s a lot of scribbling! The tiny pages contain the seeds of big scenes her later novels would be famous for. One of the stories, for example, alludes to Jane Eyre through a scene where someone locks up his enemy in the attic, after which he starts to imagine how the prisoner sets the place on fire by burning the curtains. All in all this little art project shows that small books matter too - as do, admittedly, non-medieval manuscripts, the usual focus of this Tumblr.
Pic: Sotheby’s, where this “Young Men’s Magazine nr. 2” sold (in 2011) for $1.07 million, after a bidding frenzy (read it here). More information in this article

Here’s to little things that become big things. erikkwakkel:

Great little manuscript from Charlotte Bronte
A few years ago this super charming manuscript written by one of the Bronte sisters was auctioned off. Before the talented sisters became known for their now classical novels, they made little handwritten magazines with stories for their own pleasure. Miraculously, this one from 1830 survived. It contains three short stories by Charlotte Bronte (d. 1855), who is best known as the author of Jane Eyre. The manuscript measures only 61x35 mm (half a credit card), but its nineteen pages contain a combined 4000 words. Now that’s a lot of scribbling! The tiny pages contain the seeds of big scenes her later novels would be famous for. One of the stories, for example, alludes to Jane Eyre through a scene where someone locks up his enemy in the attic, after which he starts to imagine how the prisoner sets the place on fire by burning the curtains. All in all this little art project shows that small books matter too - as do, admittedly, non-medieval manuscripts, the usual focus of this Tumblr.
Pic: Sotheby’s, where this “Young Men’s Magazine nr. 2” sold (in 2011) for $1.07 million, after a bidding frenzy (read it here). More information in this article

Here’s to little things that become big things.

erikkwakkel:

Great little manuscript from Charlotte Bronte

A few years ago this super charming manuscript written by one of the Bronte sisters was auctioned off. Before the talented sisters became known for their now classical novels, they made little handwritten magazines with stories for their own pleasure. Miraculously, this one from 1830 survived. It contains three short stories by Charlotte Bronte (d. 1855), who is best known as the author of Jane Eyre. The manuscript measures only 61x35 mm (half a credit card), but its nineteen pages contain a combined 4000 words. Now that’s a lot of scribbling! The tiny pages contain the seeds of big scenes her later novels would be famous for. One of the stories, for example, alludes to Jane Eyre through a scene where someone locks up his enemy in the attic, after which he starts to imagine how the prisoner sets the place on fire by burning the curtains. All in all this little art project shows that small books matter too - as do, admittedly, non-medieval manuscripts, the usual focus of this Tumblr.

Pic: Sotheby’s, where this “Young Men’s Magazine nr. 2” sold (in 2011) for $1.07 million, after a bidding frenzy (read it here). More information in this article

Here’s to little things that become big things.

(via paperdarts)

poetrysince1912:

—From The Gorgeous Nothings: Emily Dickinson’s Envelope Poems. See more envelope poems and read the introduction to the book in the November 2013 issue of Poetry.Marta Werner and Jen Bervin discuss The Gorgeous Nothings on Thursday, November 14 at the Poetry Foundation in Chicago.
poetrysince1912:

—From The Gorgeous Nothings: Emily Dickinson’s Envelope Poems. See more envelope poems and read the introduction to the book in the November 2013 issue of Poetry.Marta Werner and Jen Bervin discuss The Gorgeous Nothings on Thursday, November 14 at the Poetry Foundation in Chicago.

poetrysince1912:

—From The Gorgeous Nothings: Emily Dickinson’s Envelope Poems.

See more envelope poems and read the introduction to the book in the November 2013 issue of Poetry.

Marta Werner and Jen Bervin discuss The Gorgeous Nothings on Thursday, November 14 at the Poetry Foundation in Chicago.

"May Day," by Phillis Levin

I've decided to waste my life again,
Like I used to: get drunk on
The light in the leaves, find a wall
Against which something can happen,

Whatever may have happened
Long ago—let a bullet hole echoing
The will of an executioner, a crevice
In which a love note was hidden,

Be a cell where a struggling tendril
Utters a few spare syllables at dawn.
I've decided to waste my life
In a new way, to forget whoever

Touched a hair on my head, because
It doesn't matter what came to pass,
Only that it passed, because we repeat
Ourselves, we repeat ourselves.

I've decided to walk a long way
Out of the way, to allow something
Dreaded to waken for no good reason,
Let it go without saying,

Let it go as it will to the place	
It will go without saying: a wall
Against which a body was pressed
For no good reason, other than this.

Title Poem from Levin’s fourth collection, May Day (Penguin, 2008)

lastnightsreading:

Teju Cole at McNally Jackson, 10/10/13

(via themissourireview)

missmeg77:

Kingdom Animalia

by Aracelis Girmay
When I get the call about my brother,
I'm on a stopped train leaving town
& the news packs into me—freight—
though it's him on the other end
now, saying finefine— Forfeit my eyes, I want to turn away
from the hair on the floor of his house
& how it got...

Q: What do Tuesday’s POL reader Frank Bidart, James Franco, and a cemetery night watchman have in common?

A: This after-hours adventure in a mausoleum, paying their respects to a silver screen legend

Lyric connections on art and mortality from The Tallest Man on Earth (musician Kristian Matsson) and Tuesday’s POL poet Jonathan Galassi 

“I want spring to come because

I want upheaval, flooding

the excitement of the primal rite

 

…And I don’t want spring to come

because it means another, one less spring.”

 

-from Galassi’s Left-handed

theuniversemymausoleum:

Once you reach what is
inside it is outside

— Frank Bidart,
from The Third Hour of the Night

The living and dead relations

multiply in the glass.
I don’t distinguish those
that went away from those
that stay. I only perceive
the strange idea of family

travelling through the flesh.

Thoughts on legacy from Elizabeth Bishop, mutual mentor of POL poets Jonathan Galassi and Frank Bidart; from “Family Portrait,” Bishop’s translation of a poem by Carlos Drummond de Andrade

hurricanesarekisses:

"The love I’ve known is the love of

two people staring

not at each other, but in the same direction.”

Frank Bidart

For when I’m wrong.